Animal Assisted Therapy

Recently there have been some articles lately in newspapers, television and social media about animals helping out those who are sick or depressed.

Bronwen the horse.

One in particular that caught my attention recently about a hospital in Wigan that granted a dying pensioners request to see her horse for one last time while she was in hospital. The request was granted and the horse was waiting for her in the hospital car park. Bronwen the horse who Mrs Marsh has cared for 25 years walked straight up to the pensioner and nuzzled her cheek as Mrs Marsh gently spoke to her. The pensioner died several hours after the visit.

How wonderful to know that she died a happy woman.

In the UK the Royal College of Nursing has said that animals should be allowed into children’s hospitals. In a survey given of more than 750 nurses nine out of 10 of the nurses believed that animals could improve the well being of patients with mental health issues and 60 per cent said animals may speed up physical recovery. The Royal College of nursing is writing up vigorous guidelines for hospitals on how to use animal therapy safely and effectively. The new protocol would require animals and their handlers to be properly trained and to cover such things as health check-ups and inoculations.

I am 100% behind this and I am looking to help in an initiative in New Zealand between the SPCA and St John because as far as I am concerned pet assisted therapy works 100%.

Without the Little Cat I wouldn’t be here.

Photo credit: BBC

Why Little Cat?

Little Cat is my name.

My mum calls me Little Cat because she adopted me from the street. Actually I adopted her.

I was quite lost without a real place I liked to live and used to wander about the streets from house to house but mum found me and took me in and now I have a place to live that I love.

She calls me Little Cat because she doesn’t know my real name. I like my new moniker it kind of suits me. I am quite little although my tummy is getting quite big cause I love to eat all day. My mum spoils me rotten she loves to make me happy cause in return I make her happy as well. We are a team.

High Functioning Chronic Depression

I have high functioning chronic depression. If you see me out and about in town or at work you would probably not believe that I have depression. This has in fact been said to me many times. So I don’t tell people that I have depression any more mainly because they don’t believe me and also because there is a stigma about disclosing the fact you have depression. The meaning of high functioning chronic depression is here “High functioning depression belongs to a group of disorders referred to as “depression” or “depressive disorders”. The term is used to describe people who experience consistent symptoms of depression for a long period of time (over 2 years), but continue to complete the activities necessary to lead functional lives. They work and often have thriving careers. They take care of their families, their homes and their appearance while they are struggling with feelings of negativity, sadness, and despair.” www.fisherwallace.com On the other hand if you were to see me at home when I am alone and there is no one to comment or see what how I behave you may then believe I have chronic depression. At home I sleep a lot. Not just cat naps here and there or on a Sunday afternoon but for hours and hours and hours non stop. If I sleep I don’t have to think about things for a while. And then it is peaceful in my head.

Hello world!

Welcome to my blog 🙂 it is a journey through life as I try to cope with chronic depression.

And how a wee cat called Little Cat helped saved my life.

I wouldn’t be here without her.

I absolutely adore her to bits.

She is my world.